November 29, 2013
McKenna. Corsicana Tumbling Academy. Corsicana.
Pre-order your copy of LBM Dispatch #6: Texas Triangle.

McKenna. Corsicana Tumbling Academy. Corsicana.

Pre-order your copy of LBM Dispatch #6: Texas Triangle.

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November 28, 2013
Pastor Dinah. Shekinah Temple Spirit of Truth Ministries. Hutchins.
The morning after we visited Ed Young Jr’s megachurch in Dallas, we were checking out of a La Quinta Inn when we heard loud music coming from a meeting room off the lobby. When we poked our heads in to investigate we discovered Pastor Dinah R. High and her small group of parishioners (there were ten people in the room, including the two pastors and an usher) holding a spirited service. We were welcomed as if we’d been coming every week, and ended up hanging out for two hours with one of the loveliest groups of people we’ve ever encountered on a Dispatch trip. Pastor Dinah interrupted the service and insisted that each of us take the microphone for introductions. 
"The Lord has sent these people here to take pictures and witness God at work with us today," she said. "We’ve only been here for four weeks; we’re just babies, and you can surely see that we’re small in numbers, but we serve a living God. We have a little hip hop flavor, a little gospel flavor, a little old school flavor. God loves all the music and all the flavors."
Pastor Patrick Parker was running sound and pumping music through a boombox, and the worshipers —most of whom seemed to be related to Pastor Dinah— were active participants in the service, offering a steady chorus of hallelujahs, amens, and exhortations (“Walk it out!” “Yes indeed!” “My, my, my!”).
Pastor Dinah asked, “What is it, baby dolls, sons of God, that you need from Jesus today?” She said, “There are so many that passed on last night that we don’t even know about. Every one of us should be so thankful that we were able to get up this morning, put on our clothes, and walk out once again into this beautiful world.” She said, “God ain’t blessing mess. We’re here to celebrate the joy of the Lord and the joy of this life here on earth.”
She really hit her stride, though, during her sermon, which began with the words, “If you don’t know the difference between dressing and stuffing, baby, I feel nothing but sorry for you.” From there she was off and running, meandering like a Grateful Dead jam, discoursing on various types of dressing, rolls, pancakes, hot water corn bread, and good bread versus bad bread. The congregation egged her on as she built up steam: “Talk about the bread!” “Dressing is a blessing!” “I love me some pancakes!” “Make it plain!” And then, just when it seemed like the whole thing was an inspired but pointless exercise in absurdity, Pastor Dinah paused and brought it home with a rumination on the phrase “give us this day our daily bread,” the story of Jesus and the loaves and fishes, and the whole notion of spiritual nourishment and all the things it has signified throughout religious history.
At the end of the service Pastor Dinah blessed each of us in turn, and as she stood over me, held my hand, and thanked me for coming, her tears were splashing off my face. “Go out there and make some soul music,” she said. I told her I would try.

Pastor Dinah. Shekinah Temple Spirit of Truth Ministries. Hutchins.

The morning after we visited Ed Young Jr’s megachurch in Dallas, we were checking out of a La Quinta Inn when we heard loud music coming from a meeting room off the lobby. When we poked our heads in to investigate we discovered Pastor Dinah R. High and her small group of parishioners (there were ten people in the room, including the two pastors and an usher) holding a spirited service. We were welcomed as if we’d been coming every week, and ended up hanging out for two hours with one of the loveliest groups of people we’ve ever encountered on a Dispatch trip. Pastor Dinah interrupted the service and insisted that each of us take the microphone for introductions. 

"The Lord has sent these people here to take pictures and witness God at work with us today," she said. "We’ve only been here for four weeks; we’re just babies, and you can surely see that we’re small in numbers, but we serve a living God. We have a little hip hop flavor, a little gospel flavor, a little old school flavor. God loves all the music and all the flavors."

Pastor Patrick Parker was running sound and pumping music through a boombox, and the worshipers —most of whom seemed to be related to Pastor Dinah— were active participants in the service, offering a steady chorus of hallelujahs, amens, and exhortations (“Walk it out!” “Yes indeed!” “My, my, my!”).

Pastor Dinah asked, “What is it, baby dolls, sons of God, that you need from Jesus today?” She said, “There are so many that passed on last night that we don’t even know about. Every one of us should be so thankful that we were able to get up this morning, put on our clothes, and walk out once again into this beautiful world.” She said, “God ain’t blessing mess. We’re here to celebrate the joy of the Lord and the joy of this life here on earth.”

She really hit her stride, though, during her sermon, which began with the words, “If you don’t know the difference between dressing and stuffing, baby, I feel nothing but sorry for you.” From there she was off and running, meandering like a Grateful Dead jam, discoursing on various types of dressing, rolls, pancakes, hot water corn bread, and good bread versus bad bread. The congregation egged her on as she built up steam: “Talk about the bread!” “Dressing is a blessing!” “I love me some pancakes!” “Make it plain!” And then, just when it seemed like the whole thing was an inspired but pointless exercise in absurdity, Pastor Dinah paused and brought it home with a rumination on the phrase “give us this day our daily bread,” the story of Jesus and the loaves and fishes, and the whole notion of spiritual nourishment and all the things it has signified throughout religious history.

At the end of the service Pastor Dinah blessed each of us in turn, and as she stood over me, held my hand, and thanked me for coming, her tears were splashing off my face. “Go out there and make some soul music,” she said. I told her I would try.

November 27, 2013
Fellowship Church. Grapevine.
The main campus of Pastor Ed Young, Jr.’s Fellowship Church is housed in a 169,000-square-foot building. The main “worship center” seats 4,000, and there are 10 additional satellite campuses, live streaming of services, an internet bookstore and cafe, and a sprawling children’s wing. Full-immersion baptisms are performed in an outdoor baptistry connected to a lake on the property. The church has an annual operating budget of $51 million, and in 2009 the Grapevine campus was valued at $4,071,131.
Young is known for lavish stunts (he once drove his Ferrari onto the stage at a service) and a lavish lifestyle. Last year, he and his wife Lisa staged a 24-hour bed-in, complete with a live webcast, on the roof of the church to promote their book, Sexperiment: 7 Days to Lasting Intimacy With Your Spouse. The book spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

Fellowship Church. Grapevine.

The main campus of Pastor Ed Young, Jr.’s Fellowship Church is housed in a 169,000-square-foot building. The main “worship center” seats 4,000, and there are 10 additional satellite campuses, live streaming of services, an internet bookstore and cafe, and a sprawling children’s wing. Full-immersion baptisms are performed in an outdoor baptistry connected to a lake on the property. The church has an annual operating budget of $51 million, and in 2009 the Grapevine campus was valued at $4,071,131.

Young is known for lavish stunts (he once drove his Ferrari onto the stage at a service) and a lavish lifestyle. Last year, he and his wife Lisa staged a 24-hour bed-in, complete with a live webcast, on the roof of the church to promote their book, Sexperiment: 7 Days to Lasting Intimacy With Your Spouse. The book spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

November 26, 2013
Rosebud-Lott vs. Waskom. Class 2A-Division II high school football playoffs. South Lake.
Waskom, population 2178, is located just across the border from Louisiana, and it seemed like half the community’s residents made the 193-mile trek to South Lake for the undefeated Wildcats first playoff appearance in 21 years. Waskom beat Rosebud-Lott, 53-37, to set up a showdown with the 12-0 Crawford Pirates.

Rosebud-Lott vs. Waskom. Class 2A-Division II high school football playoffs. South Lake.

Waskom, population 2178, is located just across the border from Louisiana, and it seemed like half the community’s residents made the 193-mile trek to South Lake for the undefeated Wildcats first playoff appearance in 21 years. Waskom beat Rosebud-Lott, 53-37, to set up a showdown with the 12-0 Crawford Pirates.

November 26, 2013
Ronald. South Lake.
Texas was never a refuge for the lowly, or oppressed, or a beacon proclaiming human rights. It was a primordial land with a Pleistocene climate, inhabited by species inherently hostile to the Anglo-Celtic breed. Some North Americans chose to conquer it, and in the process unquestionably came to look upon themselves as a sort of chosen race.

—T.R. Fehrenbach, Lone Star: A History of Texas and the Texans. 1968.

Ronald. South Lake.

Texas was never a refuge for the lowly, or oppressed, or a beacon proclaiming human rights. It was a primordial land with a Pleistocene climate, inhabited by species inherently hostile to the Anglo-Celtic breed. Some North Americans chose to conquer it, and in the process unquestionably came to look upon themselves as a sort of chosen race.

—T.R. Fehrenbach, Lone Star: A History of Texas and the Texans. 1968.

November 25, 2013
Jimmy. Dealy Plaza. Dallas. 50th anniversary of the J.F.K. assassination.
"This is my third time here, and I’m more convinced than ever that Oswald acted alone. I’m a retired Marine Corps gunnery sergeant. I had the same training Oswald had, and with the scope and rifle he had that day I’m pretty sure most any Marine could have made those shots."

Jimmy. Dealy Plaza. Dallas. 50th anniversary of the J.F.K. assassination.

"This is my third time here, and I’m more convinced than ever that Oswald acted alone. I’m a retired Marine Corps gunnery sergeant. I had the same training Oswald had, and with the scope and rifle he had that day I’m pretty sure most any Marine could have made those shots."

November 25, 2013
Reunion Tower. Dallas.
Dallas acquired a newspaper in 1849, the printing press and the town’s first piano arriving simultaneously by oxcart. A school, a bowling alley, a wagon and buggy factory, and a tavern were also established.

—Texas: A Guide to the Lone Star State. Federal Writers’ Program of the Works Progress Administration. 1940

Pre-order your copy of LBM Dispatch #6: Texas Triangle.

Reunion Tower. Dallas.

Dallas acquired a newspaper in 1849, the printing press and the town’s first piano arriving simultaneously by oxcart. A school, a bowling alley, a wagon and buggy factory, and a tavern were also established.

Texas: A Guide to the Lone Star State. Federal Writers’ Program of the Works Progress Administration. 1940

Pre-order your copy of LBM Dispatch #6: Texas Triangle.

Add to Cart

November 24, 2013
Lee Harvey Oswald’s grave. Shannon Rose Hill Memorial Burial Park. Fort Worth.
Sixteen-year-old Jacqui and her father, Joaquin, traveled from Culver City, California to Texas for the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Jacqui, a self-professed history buff, had been planning for more than two years, and paid for the trip by recycling thousands of bottles and cans.
Jacqui considers herself something of an expert on the cast of conspiracy theory characters surrounding Kennedy’s death, and has come to her own conclusion. “I think it was Badge Man,” she said.
J.F.K. spent his last night at the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth, and spoke at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast in the hotel’s Crystal ballroom on the morning of his assassination. “There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth,” Kennedy reportedly said in his remarks.
Oswald and Kennedy were buried on the same day. Owing to a paucity of mourners, a group of reporters served as Oswald’s pall bearers.

Lee Harvey Oswald’s grave. Shannon Rose Hill Memorial Burial Park. Fort Worth.

Sixteen-year-old Jacqui and her father, Joaquin, traveled from Culver City, California to Texas for the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Jacqui, a self-professed history buff, had been planning for more than two years, and paid for the trip by recycling thousands of bottles and cans.

Jacqui considers herself something of an expert on the cast of conspiracy theory characters surrounding Kennedy’s death, and has come to her own conclusion. “I think it was Badge Man,” she said.

J.F.K. spent his last night at the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth, and spoke at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast in the hotel’s Crystal ballroom on the morning of his assassination. “There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth,” Kennedy reportedly said in his remarks.

Oswald and Kennedy were buried on the same day. Owing to a paucity of mourners, a group of reporters served as Oswald’s pall bearers.

November 24, 2013
Creation Evidence Museum. Glen Rose.
Who’s that guy up there? The statue?
That’s Tom Landry. Used to be the coach of the Dallas Cowboys.
What’s he have to do with any of this?
Not a thing in the world.

Creation Evidence Museum. Glen Rose.

Who’s that guy up there? The statue?

That’s Tom Landry. Used to be the coach of the Dallas Cowboys.

What’s he have to do with any of this?

Not a thing in the world.

November 23, 2013
Douglas. Beverly Hills.
Douglas Woodward is the former Mayor of Beverly Hills, a small community that is completely surrounded by Waco. For 35 years Woodward has run a cake decorating school —“the largest cake decorating school in Central Texas”— out of a little storefront in Beverly Hills. Both of Woodward’s parents were bakers, and he is a second-generation cake decorating instructor. 
"I’ve had customers from all over the country and all the way to Saudi Arabia," Woodward said. "I used to make cakes for Ronald Reagan. At one time Waco was the cake decorating capital of all of Texas, and we had more cake decorators per capita than anyplace else in the country. Unfortunately you’re looking at the end of the line right here. All the great old decorators are dying out, and nobody’s going to come in to take their place."
We discovered Woodward after an encounter with his cat, Smoky, in a church parking lot. “I swear to you that cat is religious,” he said. “The only place she ever goes is to the church across the street. And whenever I get out my Bible she’s right there. I can move that Bible around the house and wherever I put it she’ll find that thing and immediately start rolling around and loving it up.”

Douglas. Beverly Hills.

Douglas Woodward is the former Mayor of Beverly Hills, a small community that is completely surrounded by Waco. For 35 years Woodward has run a cake decorating school —“the largest cake decorating school in Central Texas”— out of a little storefront in Beverly Hills. Both of Woodward’s parents were bakers, and he is a second-generation cake decorating instructor. 

"I’ve had customers from all over the country and all the way to Saudi Arabia," Woodward said. "I used to make cakes for Ronald Reagan. At one time Waco was the cake decorating capital of all of Texas, and we had more cake decorators per capita than anyplace else in the country. Unfortunately you’re looking at the end of the line right here. All the great old decorators are dying out, and nobody’s going to come in to take their place."

We discovered Woodward after an encounter with his cat, Smoky, in a church parking lot. “I swear to you that cat is religious,” he said. “The only place she ever goes is to the church across the street. And whenever I get out my Bible she’s right there. I can move that Bible around the house and wherever I put it she’ll find that thing and immediately start rolling around and loving it up.”